The Wing-Friends and Other Books

In Blogger's slideshows images are greatly reduced, so lose much of their impact. And captions added to them in Picasa Albums vanish, so the images shown above are: the Milky Way, the Orion Nebula, Earth, Earth with New Zealand circled, New Zealand, Auckland & the Hauraki Gulf, Waiheke Island, some native NZ forest, a Fantail and chicks, various doves, etc.

(If you want to see the first ten images in their original size, they are in a posting made on the 24th of November 2011.)

My book The Wing-Friends is an imaginative tale of a small brave boy, a magical adventure, a magnificent Pegasus and the wonderful Kingdom of the Pegasi. It has been given very good reviews, and virtually every reader on Goodreads has so far awarded it five stars. It is available here. Some of my other writings are available as e-books, such as The Lower Deck, which is an over-the-top take on Waiheke happenings--sort of.

Thursday, 24 July 2014


Section 25 of the Crimes Act 1961 says: 'Ignorance of law--the fact that an offender is ignorant of the law is not an excuse for any offence committed by him or her.'

But the ruling by the 'Independent' Police Conduct Authority's on the failure of the police to prosecute GCSB spies for illegally spying on Kim Dotcom and scores of New Zealanders says in effect that criminal law does not apply to spooks. They can be as ignorant, careless, stupid or crass as they please and do as they please, but when they break the law they cannot be touched.

It's obvious why. They cannot tell the difference between the rule of law and the laws of quantum physics--that bit about disconnected particles, which even if they are on opposite sides of the universe are 'entangled', so one controls the other and affects it instantly. Einstein called it 'spooky action at a distance.' They must have thought, 'We're spooks', so that obviously applies to us. We're entangled with everybody else, so we can control and affect them anyway we please.' Simple really.


Saturday, 8 February 2014


A national flag should be simple, it should have a bold design that is instantly recognised, even at at a distance, and it should say 'this is what we are.'

New Zealand is a long narrow country between two seas; its Maori name is Aotearoa, which means Land of the Long White Cloud; it is the home of a people who are known the world over as Kiwis, after their unique native bird; our head of state is the Queen, who uses royal blue.

This design for a flag combines all those elements.

Tasman Sea        Land of the Long White Cloud      Pacific Ocean
It keeps a connection with the present flag by using the same deep blue, but here it represents the Tasman Sea on one side of the country and the Pacific on the other. In the centre the white panel represents Aotearoa, the Land of the Long White Cloud, and the green kiwi combines our national symbol--long known the world over--with the green that New Zealand is also famous for.

The kiwi could be less stylised than the one shown here, such as the one that has long been used in the roundels on RNZAF aircraft, but green not red:

Tasman Sea         Land of the Long White Cloud        Pacific Ocean

Or the kiwi could be more natural-looking ('proper', to use the heraldic term), such as the variation below, which was one I submitted to the Flag Consideration Panel along with the stylised version. The New Zealand Herald featured it in a selection of designs (where the rather phallic 3, 4, and 14 are strange preferences).

Tasman Sea          Land of the Long White Cloud        Pacific Ocean

The green of the kiwi in that one is the best shade of the three, but getting colours right on computer screens is always a problem. Different software may render a colour in different ways. (The one above varies a little from the one I put on the Flag Consideration Panel's site; the position of the kiwi has been improved by being moved slightly down and to the right to give better balance). 

This design, in detail and in combination, is all New Zealand, pure New Zealand, nothing but New Zealand. There is not a single element in it that does not say 'New Zealand'; and in combination it shouts 'This is New Zealand and nowhere else!'